A password manager is an important tool to enable you to securely store all of your passwords.They offer so many amazing features as well!

5 Ways A Password Manager Will Improve Your Life

Do you know that feeling of frustration when you need to log into an account that you only use occasionally and can’t remember the password? I certainly do.

Something that should take a few seconds turns into a few minutes instead to request a password reset and go through the whole process of creating a new password. Heaven forbid, you lock yourself out of a financial account and actually have to call someone to request a reset (that’s the absolute worst in my opinion)!

A password manager is an important tool to enable you to securely store all of your passwords.They offer so many amazing features as well!I would be willing to bet that I have the worst memory of anyone I know…at least under the age of 70. I couldn’t tell you what I ate for breakfast let alone any of my passwords, even if I just set them recently.

Enter my best friend the password manager.

Once I set up and implemented my password manager over a year ago, I’ve discovered that I have nearly 150 online accounts that require a login. No wonder I was regularly having to reset passwords, even when I was trying to keep up a password-protected spreadsheet with all my usernames and passwords.

Without further adieu, here are several ways that using a password manager has improved my life.

#1: It Saves Me Time

I’m always trying to come up with ways to be more efficient. I’ve especially found my time to be more and more valuable after having kids and not having as much control over it.

Using a password manager not only save you time in finding your passwords (whether you keep them written down somewhere, in a spreadsheet or some other tracking method). It also saves you time by allowing you to update your password automatically and generating new secure passwords automatically.

#2: It Is Less Frustrating

Seriously, having to reset passwords is truly frustrating, especially if I’m in a hurry to find some information quickly. I personally try to decrease frustration in my life wherever possible. There are plenty of frustrating things I can’t avoid, but this is one that I can!

#3: It Increases Security

One of the main critiques of a password manager is also its security. Some people may not be comfortable with having all of their passwords, especially for financial accounts, stored in one central location.

However, security experts agree that the benefits of password managers outweigh the risks and that it’s less secure to have passwords stored in spreadsheets or written down. The key is to have a really strong master password for the password manager.

Some password managers also advise you about security breaches that have occurred for companies that you have accounts with. This enables you to quickly change your passwords to avoid being the victim of fraud.

Note: from my research, I did find that using a browser extension is not recommended, as it increases your risk of someone being able to access your passwords. I’ve since switched to logging into my password manager and launching all of my accounts directly from inside the “Vault”.

#4: You Can Access It Anywhere

Password managers store information on the cloud, so you are able to access your passwords anywhere that you have internet access. I love being able to use the phone app when I’m out and about and want to login to check something or order something online.

#5: Your Loved Ones Can Access It Also

Not only can you share passwords with other users securely (such as a spouse or child), but you can also set emergency access options as well.

An example of this would be if you were to become incapacitated for an extended period of time. If properly set up, a person that you’ve previously approved could request emergency access to specific account login and password information and receive it as long as you don’t deny the request within a specified period of time.

Combined with a list of accounts in your estate plan, this access will really help your family members to manage your affairs.

Final Thoughts

If you are considering using a password manager, there are three major companies that I suggest. I personally use LastPass, which is totally free. Dashlane and 1Password are other great options as well.

I’m not an affiliate for any of these password managers. It’s just something that has made my life SO much easier and that I think everyone should use. It’s free, secure and will improve your life, I promise!

Do you use a password manager? Why or why not?

LIKED IT? PLEASE SHARE!

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest

6 Responses

  1. Definitely agree with this, Kathryn. I have just shy of 800 accounts in mine and that doesn’t even take into consideration the accounts I have for work. My wife and brother have a copy of my master password which are stored in their password managers for emergencies.

    I use KeePass because I like that it’s an offline database, which gives me a little more obscurity (LastPass has been hacked once). With some plugins and using something like Google Drive or Dropbox, it can be synced across all my devices and very easy to use.

    But it does require slightly more on the technical side so the three you mentioned are great for most users.

    Great post!

    — Jim

    1. 800 accounts? Wowza! I’ve heard a little about KeePass and it does seem to be not quite as user friendly (plus, I wonder how many accounts the typical person has now!). Thanks for stopping by 🙂

  2. I’m not sure how many people are doing this but for my mobile banking, I’m allowing it to use my fingerprint as my log-in. My friends also do this and I’ve read it’s secure. Do you have any thoughts about the fingerprint log-in mechanism from banking mobile apps?

    1. The fingerprint log-in option is definitely more secure than a password plus I’m assuming you would also have a password to log in to your actual phone. Does your bank require two-factor authentication as well (when logging in from a new device?).

Comments are closed.